National Geographic dévoile ses plus belles photos Instagram de 2017

Avec son Best of Instagram 2017, National Geographic nous dévoile les photos les plus belles et les plus populaires publiées cette année sur leur compte Instagram. Nous retrouvons bien sûr dans cette série quelques images des gagnants du National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year 2017, mais aussi des photographies issues de leurs reportages et des contributions des lecteurs. Vous pouvez également suivre National Geographic sur leur compte Instagram.

© Charlie Hamilton James / Frans Lanting (National Geographic)

Photo by @CristinaMittermeier // This is what a starving polar bear looks like. Weak muscles, atrophied by extended starvation could barely hold him up. Our @Sea_Legacy team watched as he painfully staggered towards the abandoned fishing camp from which we were observing and found some trash to eat—a piece of foam from the seat of a snowmobile, as we later found out. People have asked why we couldn’t help it, why we didn’t feed it. In addition to being illegal to feed wildlife, polar bears like this one need several hundred pounds of meat to survive. They primarily eat seals and they struggle when they are stranded for long periods of time on land, without a sea ice platform from which to hunt. We didn’t have a weapon and we didn’t have any food. There literally was nothing we could do for him as we were hundreds of miles from the nearest Inuit community. What could we have done? What we did do was push through our tears knowing that this footage was going to help connect a global audience to the biggest issue facing us as a species today. It is true that we don’t know what caused this animal to starve but we are certain that unless we curb carbon emissions, sea ice will continue to disappear and many more bears will starve. With these images, we want to wake the world up to the imminence of climate change and to how it will affect wildlife and people for decades to come. For solutions on how each and everyone can make a positive impact on this planet #follow me at @CristinaMittermeier or go to @Sea_Legacy. #nature #naturelovers #bethechange #FaceofClimateChange #StopFossilFuels #NoArcticDrilling #TurningtheTide with @SeaLegacy. With @PaulNicklen and our entire team. Thank you @natgeo for helping us try and reach the world.

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Photo by @jenniferhayesig A heart breaking find. We arrived at a remote small island in Busuanga Philippines to dive and to scout for plastic debris. Two dogs appeared on the beach and began to swim to our boat. The heavy surf turned them back. I could see they were thin. I abandoned my dive and swam ashore with rice. The dogs had been left behind and and were extremely emaciated and weak. They were slowly starving to death on an island without any source of food. I fed them and swam back to our boat and asked our crew to kayak in freshwater and more rice. We spent a few hours on shore with these wonderful creatures. They were gentle, friendly and in good spirits despite their desperate situation. Ironically I found the debris our team was looking for on shore when I found the dogs. They were pawing through the debris seeking anything to eat. We are working with locals to keep them fed by boat until we can get them off the island. We are in the process of determining the best rescue for them, either a safe place in the Philippines or @daviddoubilet and I will adopt them, get them to a vet for treatment and vaccinations and fly them back to New York. We are calling these two, a male and female, the "dugong dogs" because we were working with dugongs in the area. Stay tuned for the rest of their story. // with @natgeo in Philippines// #ocean #abandoned #dog #rescuedog #dugongdog #AChristmasStory #merrychristmas #hope #respect #RescueMe #trust #kindness #DoTheRightThing #compassion for a video of the #dugongdogs follow @jenniferhayesig

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Images © National Geographic

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